Michael B. Jordan Apologizes For ‘J’Ouvert’ Rum Line After Fans Accuse Him Of Cultural Appropriation, Nicki Minaj Enters The Chat

Michael B. Jordan has issued an apology regarding the name of his new rum, J’Ouvert after fans accused him of cultural appropriation. Nicki Minaj even chimed in on the controversy. Get it all inside…

The Internet got turned up on Michael B. Jordan after he announced the name of his new rum line. The reason? Well, folks accused him of cultural appropriation and made sure he knew it.

The Black Panther star recently launched his new line of rum called J’Ouvert and he celebrated with a launch party over the weekend. Flicks from the shindig quickly started a social media frenzy. West Indians started to blast the CREED star for cultural appropriation over the name of his new rum as his girlfriend Lori Harvey offered her support:

 

What’s next? A free doubles with every #JouvertRum purchase?! someone point out Michael B Jordan’s Trini roots fast for me please!!! Cuz I’m not understanding this shit. Is it his grandma who makes the rum cakes??? pic.twitter.com/7Q8E1uowmU

— Hot & Unbothered (@AllianaSabrina) June 20, 2021

J’Ouvert is the huge annual street party, which official kicks off Carnival in many Caribbean islands, rooted in the celebration of enslaved people’s independence within the african diaspora in caribbean countries. The name J’Ouvert originates from the French jour ouvert, meaning day break or morning, and signals the start of Carnival.

"Derived from the Antellian Creole French term meaning ‘daybreak,’ J’Ouvert originated in the pre-dawn streets of Trinidad, as celebrations of emancipation combined with Carnival season to serve as the festival’s informal commencements," the rum’s box reads.

West Indians were NOT here for the name of the new rum and made it known, despite his business partner on the rum reportedly being West Indian. At the same time, some social media users came to his defense. Some asked how this is any different than Afro-Caribbean people who aren’t African American who participated and profitted off Juneteenth or own restaurants or businesses that sell Soul Food.

People definitely weren’t shy about posting their opinions to Twitter:

 

Not the African Americans telling us it’s not that deep just because Michael B Jordan is black. pic.twitter.com/zhJehyFHdo

— Jasmine Cumberbatch (@jazzycumbers) June 22, 2021

 

 

Michael B Jordan never been to jouvert or mass. But has the nerve to want to profit off West Indian culture and call it Jouvert Rum…. pic.twitter.com/RT8O3InIwm

— D.D. Aesthetic | IG:_iamdda (@_iamdda) June 20, 2021

 

 

imagine trying to explain what jouvert is to someone and they go “oh michael b jordan rum” https://t.co/kmTtYuBRYb

— nika (@spxcyy) June 20, 2021

 

 

Americans trying to tell Caribbean people how to feel about Michael b Jordan trying to trademark the word ”Jouvert” just doesn’t sit right with me#michaelbjordan #JouvertRum pic.twitter.com/Nw8wgoVjSb

— Attracted to food (@JordanAcee) June 22, 2021

 

 

Imagine Michael B. Jordan home chilling one day (rich already), and his Trini friend call him about a project….. and iit end up ALL this Bacchanal!?

— Aaron Local Fingal (@AaronFingal) June 22, 2021

 

 

Michael B Jordan names his Rum J’Ouvert, Caribbeans accuse him of cultural appropriation.

Adele shows up to Carnival with Bantu knots and Caribbeans are like, "You go, Adele, Out of Many One People."

Is this REALLY about cultural appropriation or something else? pic.twitter.com/mBXFKXrGDe

— Jaxson Reid (@JaxsonReid2) June 23, 2021

 

 

Michael B Jordan as an African in White Owned Disney Movie, "Black Panther" = GOOD
Michael B Jordan as a Black American BUSINESS man with a rum named after a Caribbean Carnival event. = BAD

This is definitely about something else. pic.twitter.com/vxc5qgME8M

— Jaxson Reid (@JaxsonReid2) June 23, 2021

 

 

Meet Mason Wells, from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He is the OWNER of King Juice and is the OWNER of CALYPSO Drink. The slogan EVEN says, "Taste of the Islands" and trademarked it.

But Michael B. Jordan is culturally appropriating, right?

Where my people at?pic.twitter.com/xv77GiBD1w

— Jaxson Reid (@JaxsonReid2) June 23, 2021

 

 

The Trini that made Michael B Jordan the face of that rum is sitting back drinking his/her glass of Jouvert watching MBJ face backlash. pic.twitter.com/VhYw54T32M

— Mack Milds (@sabiotrix) June 22, 2021

 

A Change.org petition aiming to stop MBJ and his business partners from trademarking the word J’Ouvert collected more than 12,500 signatures as of Wednesday afternoon.

Rapper Nicki Minaj – who was born in Trinidad and Tobago – also spoke out, asking MBJ to consider changing the name of his new rum.

 

 

 
 

 

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A post shared by Barbie (@nickiminaj)

 

"I’m sure MBJ didn’t intentionally do anything he thought Caribbean ppl would find offensive— but now that you are aware, change the name & continue to flourish & prosper. #jouvert," she wrote.

 

Nicki Minaj calling out Michael B. Jordan on her enormous platform for what Trini and Afro Caribbeans view as something tone def and disrespectful, is something most Black American celebs would never do! Too many are spineless puppets who play deaf n dumb when we’re disrespected

— Afro American Jay (@AfroAmericanJay) June 22, 2021

 

"Nicki Minaj calling out Michael B. Jordan on her enormous platform for what Trini and Afro Caribbeans view as something tone def and disrespectful, is something most Black American celebs would never do! Too many are spineless puppets who play deaf n dumb when we’re disrespected," one fan tweeted.

The CREED star heard everyone’s complaints and issued an apology on his IG Stories.

 

 

 
 

 

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A post shared by TheYBF (@theybf_daily)

 

"I just wanna say on behalf of myself & my partners, our intention was never to offend or hurt a culture (we love & respect) and hoped to celebrate & shine a positive light on," he wrote. "Last few days has been a lot of listening. A lot of learning and engaging in countless community conversations."

"We hear you. I hear you & want to be clear that we are in the process of renaming," he added.

"We sincerely apologize and look forward to introducing a brand we can all be proud of," he concluded.

Now, everyone is content.

Photo: DFree/Shutterstock.com

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